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DROUGHT PUMPING RATE

WE HAVE ONE JOB: YOUR WATER

This summer, due to low flows and poor winter runoff, Western Colorado’s historically exceptional drought conditions prompted us to make changes in our customer's water, which included blending water from the Colorado River with water supply from the Plateau Creek watershed. 

 

On June 10th, 2021 Ute Water began pumping from a secondary source, the Colorado River, and blended it with water from the Plateau Creek watershed, the District’s primary water source. The purpose of blending water from the two sources was to preserve water quality while slowing down the draw-down of reservoirs, in turn supplementing water demand.

 

It was the first time since the District was formed 65 years ago that water from the Colorado River was utilized to supplement demand due to drought conditions.

As of November 1st, the District is no longer pumping water from the Colorado River and will no longer be charging the 2% Drought Pumping Rate.

What impacts did these changes have it have to our water? A few things.

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IMPACT ON WATER QUALITY

As of November 1st, the District is no longer pumping from the Colorado River. A majority of the District’s water supply is still coming from the Plateau Creek watershed, which is naturally “harder” water than the water from the tailrace of the Lower Molina Power Plant.

You may continue to notice spots on dishes, or white build-up on swamp cooler pads, water heaters, fixtures, and more. We urge all residents not to be alarmed, this water is safe to drink and consume, simply leaving behind calcium carbonate as it evaporates. Adding vinegar and other products to dishwashers aids in reducing spots on dishes. There are products available to help mitigate the build-up on evaporative cooler pads as well.

Customers can now view the District's Water Quality Dashboard for specific information about current water quality. The dashboard information is updated weekly information and is reflective of the previous week's water quality.

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IMPACT ON BILLING RATES

To offset the operational costs associated with pumping water from the Colorado River, a minimal 2% Drought Pumping Rate was added to District customer’s monthly water bills, effective July 1, 2021. 

 

As of November 1st, the District is no longer pumping water from the Colorado River and will no longer be charging the 2% Drought Pumping Rate.

 

WHAT YOU CAN DO

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Drought is still persistent on our local community and state. Even during the winter months, water conservation is vital to preserving the water we currently have saved. 

 

Find more helpful tips, resources, education, and information on how you can reduce your use through our collaborative committee, Drought Response Information Project (DRIP).

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